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Weirdly Wired Woman: A Review of “Vagina”
Book Reviews

Weirdly Wired Woman: A Review of “Vagina”

[Puns are almost completely unavoidable when discussing a book about vaginas, so please bear with me—and pardon any accidental (and purely coincidental) misspellings of “come”.] When I was in elementary school (before I could figure out my dad’s overly simplistic codes for the parental locks and watch “Skinemax”), I’d stay up late to watch Howard Stern on … Continue reading

Liberal Democracy and Public Stupidity: A Review of “Defending Politics”
Book Reviews

Liberal Democracy and Public Stupidity: A Review of “Defending Politics”

Last May, well before I started reviewing books for PolicyMic, Oxford University Press published Defending Politics: Why Democracy Matters in the Twenty-First Century by Matthew Flinders, a politics professor at the University of Sheffield. I only discovered it last Saturday while browsing the shelves at B&N, and I ended up buying it on impulse. I just had to. Though it may … Continue reading

Barack Obama, Jerk-in-Chief: A Review of “The Price of Politics”
Book Reviews

Barack Obama, Jerk-in-Chief: A Review of “The Price of Politics”

In an appealing 381-page package that reads like 80 pages, legendary investigative journalist Bob Woodward narrates the political fighting over federal spending and tax policy, as well as the controversial (mis) management of the U.S. economy, by both the executive and legislative branches between 2009 and the summer of 2012. Delving into one fascinating turn … Continue reading

Useless Democrats and Crazy Republicans: A Review of “The Party Is Over”
Book Reviews

Useless Democrats and Crazy Republicans: A Review of “The Party Is Over”

Former Republican Party insider Mike Lofgren’s The Party is Over: How Republicans Went Crazy, Democrats Became Useless, and the Middle Class Got Shafted (Penguin, 2012), is an admirable effort because, right from the get-go and all throughout, it remains true to its purpose, which is succinctly laid out at the very start: “This book is about America’s … Continue reading

The Blame Game: America’s Problem With Taking Responsibility
Relevant Reads

The Blame Game: America’s Problem With Taking Responsibility

For a while, I had been looking for an excuse to focus my Relevant Reads series on Scapegoat: A History of Blaming Other People by Charlie Campbell (Overlook, 2011)—my favorite book, like, ever. Beyond what the whole title suggests, Scapegoat brilliantly illustrates our stubborn habit of not only being almost naturally compelled to convict one another, but absolving ourselves when undesirable … Continue reading